Microsoft Reveals Project xCloud for Games, Public Trials to Begin in 2019

Microsoft Reveals Project xCloud for Games, Public Trials to Begin in 2019

Microsoft revealed the new cloud streaming service during the company's keynote on the E3 2018 conference.

Microsoft says it's now testing out Project xCloud and plans to open up tests to the public next year.

Microsoft says its goal with Project xCloud is to bring the console gaming experience to everyone.

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Microsoft already has a big presence in this industry. Tests are now being run with recent and upcoming games at Microsoft, and data centers have been supplied with a "new customizable blade that can host the component parts of multiple Xbox One consoles".

Starting next year, gamers across consoles, PCs, and mobile devices will be able to access a new service from Microsoft called Project xCloud that will provide access to a library of more than 3,000 games developed for Xbox.

The Redmond giant may ultimately come out on top, however, given its years of experience in both console gaming and cloud computing.

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The streaming service has been built using a customizable blade that can host the component parts of multiple Xbox One consoles along with all the necessary parts needed to stream said infrastructure straight to your devices.

While a lot of work has already gone into the project, the technology is still in its infancy, and Microsoft is predicting a "multi-year journey" before it's ready for consumers. On October 8, Microsoft officials said via a blog post that "Project xCloud" would be available to external testers some time in calendar 2019.

Microsoft has now given us a glimpse of how things could work, with the unveiling of Project xCloud. The test now runs at 10 megabits per second; Project xCloud can push the limits of 4G technology while being fully scalable for the upcoming 5G technology. Microsoft claims that xCloud is now running at 10 megabits per second, which is mid-range download speed for phone carriers such as Verizon and AT&T that offer 4G LTE. In addition to solving latency, other important considerations are supporting the graphical fidelity and framerates that preserve the artist's original intentions, and the type of input a player has available.

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Microsoft has announced that it has datacenters in 54 regions that should support 140 countries around the world.

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