Spreading E.coli outbreak prompts USA lettuce warning

Spreading E.coli outbreak prompts USA lettuce warning

The CDC has advised consumers to avoid romaine lettuce altogether unless they are able to confirm that it was grown elsewhere.

Romaine lettuce is off the menu of USA households and restaurants, health authorities ordered on Friday after a spreading E.coli outbreak infected 53 people in 16 states.

The previous alerts just applied to sliced romaine on its own and as component of tossed salads & mixed greens.

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The CDC has issued an E. coli warning about all romaine lettuce from the Yuma, Arizona area.

The E coli break out has contaminated a total amount of 53 individuals within 16 states, authorities pointed out. These people reported becoming ill in the time period of March 13 to April 6, 2018. People should also wash their hands after cleaning lettuce.

The warning prompted several restaurants in Southern Arizona to stop selling salads temporarily, while others reported they have safe shipments of lettuce and are serving it. This includes whole heads and hearts of romaine, chopped romaine, and salads and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce.

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If romaine lettuce has been present in consumers' refrigerator shelves, they should follow the CDC's five steps to sanitize their fridge.

"No common grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified at this time", the CDC said.

"People who have store-bought romaine lettuce at home, including whole heads and hearts of romaine, chopped romaine, and salads and salad mixes containing romaine lettuce, should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.", the CDC said.

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The FDA is continuing to investigate this outbreak and will share more information as it becomes available. The bacteria that make these toxins are called Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, or STEC for short. More serious infections may lead to complications including a type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome, according to the CDC.

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