Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

Facebook is asking for nude photos to fight revenge porn

Facebook is testing a counterintuitive new approach to fighting revenge porn by asking users to voluntarily send in their own nude photos, USA Today reported Wednesday.

"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly", Grant told the news outlet.

If an image passes a human evaluation, Facebook will then create a "hash" of the image, which is like a unique fingerprint for the file, as Motherboard reported. "Facebook's hashing system would then be able to recognize those images in the future without needing to store them on its servers".

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In April, Facebook detailed plans to fight revenge porn, including an artificial intelligence tool capable of matching photos to prevent them from appearing on platforms like Messenger or Instagram.

Julie Inman Grant, Austrailian eSafety Commissioner, says the program has the potential to disable the "control and power perpetrators hold over victims", particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion.

"So if somebody tried to upload that same image, which would have the same digital footprint or hash value, it will be prevented from being uploaded".

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Facebook has finally found a way to protect users from having their nudes leaked and disseminated over the social network without their consent, but it's a little unorthodox.

But the real question is - who is ready to share their nudes with Facebook? If it succeeds, hopefully expect it rollout throughout the rest of the world if Facebook keeps getting government support. "Some information is more valuable for hackers, and hashed photos could be one of them". The World Bank estimates that 78.2 percent of the US population uses the internet, meaning that 10.9 million Americans (roughly the populations of New York City and Los Angeles combined) are revenge porn victims.

Revenge porn distributed on Facebook can be especially damaging to people, lawyer Alexandra Whiston-Dew told Newsweek, because "they have their friends, family, work colleagues all gathered in one place for maximum humiliation by publication", she explained. More protections for people who could be affected by revenge porn are desperately needed, but this method of protecting privacy has some people unnerved.

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